Tolkien, artist

Still Reading...

One of the things that brings me joy is reading. What! A writer reading? What would I be doing with something so silly and so non-physical as an activity in my life? But reading, the movement of recognized symbols into words and mental imagery when seen through the eyes (or fingertips in the case of braille), is central to my existence and happiness. It makes me think about those societies that don't have a written language or those people who either cannot or are not allowed to read.




To be able to read is to be given a key that opens the world to you. Suddenly you can read the thoughts of people who are long dead or are much farther away from you than the next block, street, town or nation. Reading allows the spread of ideas. And just like artwork, reading can jump across national boundaries to affect people in far distant areas. If something written is allowed to spread, it can affect the future in ways unknown to us. So when we, as authors, take up our pens or keyboards, we have the potential to affect the life of people who haven't even been born yet. That's a heavy responsibility.


I've been reading a lot of books lately, mostly romance and mystery (don't groan...I have my reasons). But I've also downloaded recommendations from others and have had my world expanded because of those recommendations. I've learned more about English humor and early/mid 20th century culture from the William books that Linda Hoyland recommended to me, I've explored the world of erotic literature by reading the Adrian English series by Josh Lanyon and the PsyCop series by Jordan Castillo Price, and I've also read more pedestrian works. I'm returning to reading fan fiction because that's a great love of mine that I don't think will ever end. Books were my first treasure and I think will probably be my last one as well. Thanks to all of the authors I've met and have yet to meet in my journey through life.
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I always feel strange when I visit a home with no books or reading material in sight. I wonder what they do if they don't read something, even magazines and newspapers.

Nothing makes me want to write more than reading a good story.
I feel the same. I also feel a bit off when the books that they have are only factual, no fiction among them. My college roommate had been raised on only fact and had no understanding for tales or stories of any kind. It seemed like such a narrow focus.

- Erulisse (one L)
I'm reading a book in the car, a book in the livingroom, a book in the bathroom...
The advantage of my NookColor, although I still have books in every room of my house.

- Erulisse (one L)
I love reading real life stories; what happened/happens to people, places, things. It fascinates me.

BUT!

Like with learning a language, you can learn the words and grammar but you will be totally clueless to the country, the people, until you read their myths, legends and fiction.

Those simple (or complex) stories reach down in to their souls, pluck stings of music so clear yet convoluted that harkens right back to creation! But if you don't bother to read them, or your own for that matter, I feel that you (plural) are missing out entirely.

When I discovered myth (oh around the 7th or 8th grade) it opened up a world for me I never dreamed of. I know the so-called 'fairy' stores, Grimm's tales, Robin Hood; but looking back, I'd say my understanding of them were pretty shallow without the facts and yes, the deep soul that came later when I hit on once-oral stories becoming written. I blame Snorri Sturlison for that one. LOL
The foundations of tales are fascinating, and as an Anthropologist/Archaeologist, I love the history/prehistory of people and seeing myths, legends and practices pulled through from ancient times until modern times. I have to agree with you on this one, Miz Mik :-)

- Erulisse (one L)
I do love reading, always have. My mother gave up trying to pull my nose out of a good book, and my teachers almost always had to physically come up to me before I would hear them call the class to order. I'm a hopeless reader with a vivid imagination :-)

- Erulisse (one L)
I'm so pleased you are reading William. I just love those books,as did my mum. They helped me a lot when she died.
William is really funny and so very British. I didn't find a copyright date. Can you give me a clue about when the book was originally written?
It seems a bit Edwardian - electricity exists but isn't that common, and horses are still quite common.

- Erulisse (one L)
The William books began in the early 1930's I think and the last one was written in the early 1970's. Richmal Compton was a school mistress who taught Classics and suffered from the effects of polio in her youth. She never married and based William on her brother.

Edited at 2012-07-11 04:58 am (UTC)
Thanks, Linda. I was LOL at the restaurant when I started the first book. Such a rascal.

- Erulisse (one L)